Fellows

In 2011, ASB created the status of Fellow to recognize professional achievement and service of the top members of the Society and to encourage continued service to the Society in a leadership role.

Guidelines

Fellow status is awarded to select members of the ASB to:

1) Recognize exceptional scientific and professional achievement in the field of
biomechanics,

2) Recognize exceptional service to the ASB, and

3) Encourage continued service to the Society in a leadership role.

Fellow Nomination Process Timeline: The Fellow nomination and confirmation process begins after the conclusion of the Annual Meeting and is completed prior to abstract submission for the following year’s Annual Meeting, i.e. November 15th.

Step 1. Prospective Fellows must be nominated by a current ASB Fellow. To be considered for the following year, the nomination letter must be received by the Past-President after the conclusion of the Annual Meeting and before November 15th.

Step 2. Nominee’s basic membership and ASB participation criteria will be verified by the Secretary of the ASB.

Step 3. Nominee’s e-portfolio is generated, including:

-Current CV of Nominee (sent by Nominator to the Past President before November 15th)

-Nomination letter and second letter supporting the nomination (both letters sent by

-Nominator to the Past President after the Annual Meeting and before November 15th). The
letters should address specifics outlined in the review criteria.

Source of Nomination letters: Two letters are required.

1. Nomination Letter: From a current ASB Fellow

2. Second Letter supporting the nomination: Also from a current ASB Fellow.*

Step 4. The Fellow Nomination Review Committee, formed by the Past President and comprised of ASB Fellows representing each sub-discipline, reviews nominee’s eportolio (e.g. Nominee’s folder on google groups, password protected). The five Review Committee members then email their votes to the Past President once the review of applicants is completed.

Step 5. Past President formulates and submits a proposed list of candidates to be awarded Fellow status to the ASB Executive Board. The names of nominees supported by three or more of the five Nomination Review Committee members are automatically forwarded to the ASB Executive Board for approval. The President-Elect, President, and Past President further review nominees receiving support from at least 3 of the 5 Nomination Review Committee members. Nominees supported by consensus of the presidential line are then forwarded to the XB for approval. Recommendations for Fellow status are forwarded from the Past President to the ASB Executive Board for final review. Nominees not forwarded to the ASB Executive Board can be nominated again for Fellow status in two years (e.g. if nominated in 2013, they can be nominated again in 2015).

Step 6. Fellow confirmation requires a two-thirds vote of the ASB Executive Board. Confirmation process is completed prior to the abstract submission deadline for Annual Meeting.

* A letter from an established research scientist of senior rank (comparable to an ASB Fellow in the
nominee’s sub-discipline) may also be considered (requires pre-approval by Past President)

ASB Fellows

 

Kai-Nan An

Kai-Nan An

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: Mayo Clinic

Kai-Nan An received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics in 1975 from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA. He is currently the Director (1993-present) of the Orthopedic Biomechanics Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, and Professor of Bioengineering, Mayo Medical School. He was named the John and Posy Krehbiel Professor of Orthopedics in 1993. He has co-authored more than 750 scientific articles and book chapters. He has the fortune of training more than 200 fellows from all over the world, with backgrounds ranging from engineering to medicine.

Dr. An’s research interests include biomechanics, biomaterials, orthopedics, and rehabilitation. He has received several awards from various professional societies. His passion is to serve Jesus Christ, his Lord and Savior.

Don Anderson

Don Anderson

Fellow Since: 2014

Current Affiliation: University of Iowa

Donald D. Anderson, Ph.D. holds the Richard and Jan Johnston Chair of Orthopedic Biomechanics and is Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the University of Iowa, where he is a Professor in the Departments of Orthopedics & Rehabilitation, Biomedical Engineering, and Industrial Engineering. Dr. Anderson holds a BSE (1985) in Biomedical Engineering, as well as an MS (1986) and a PhD (1989) in Mechanical Engineering (Biomechanics emphasis), all from the University of Iowa. He has over twenty years of post-doctoral professional experience. First in Pittsburgh (1990-1997) – Director, Biomechanics Research Laboratory, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute; then in Minneapolis (1997-2002) – Director, Biomechanics Laboratory, Minneapolis Sports Medicine Center; and finally back in Iowa City (2002-present).

Don has been an ASB member since 1988, when he joined as a PhD student. He has served ASB most notably in the past as the Newsletter Editor (2000-2003), as Secretary/Treasurer (2004-2007), and as President (2010-2013). He has also provided ad hoc Program Committee work and helped organize an Upper Midwest Regional Meeting in 2004. He is a member of the Orthopaedic Research Society, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, the Osteoarthritis Research Society International, and the International Society of Biomechanics.

Dr. Anderson’s primary research focus has been on articular joint biomechanics, specifically investigating the mechanical relationship between joint injury and subsequent development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The work involves nurturing interactions between a growing inter-disciplinary group of clinicians, engineers, and biologists. Much of his work has involved computational modeling and medical image analysis. A recent line of research related to simulation and surgical skills training/assessment has also proven particularly rewarding. The Whitaker Foundation, the National Football League, the Arthritis Foundation, the National Board of Medical Examiners, the DoD, the AHRQ, and the NIH have all funded his research.

Dr. An’s research interests include biomechanics, biomaterials, orthopedics, and rehabilitation. He has received several awards from various professional societies. His passion is to serve Jesus Christ, his Lord and Savior.

Thomas Andriacchi

Thomas Andriacchi

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: Stanford University

Thomas P. Andriacchi is a Professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Orthopedic Surgery at Stanford University and a Research Career Scientist at The Bone and Joint Center of Excellence at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration. Before coming to Stanford in 1998 he was a Professor and the first Associate Chair for Research in the Department of Orthopedics at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. His research over the past thirty years has involved the development and application of a multidisciplinary research framework for the study of osteoarthritis with a focus on ambulatory mechanics. This research is fundamental in establishing the importance of analyzing human movement as a means of understanding musculoskeletal pathology and specifically the initiation and progression osteoarthritis of the knee joint. His recent work has provided insight into the importance of ambulatory load modifying interventions for the treatment of knee OA as well as the association between ACL injury and premature knee OA.

Dr. Andriacchi’s research has been recognized by a number of prestigious awards including twice receiving the Kappa Delta Award (the highest research award of the Orthopedic Research Society). He received the Borelli Award from ASB in 2004 and the H.R. Lissner Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in 2009 for outstanding achievements in the field of bioengineering. Tom served as the ASB Secretary/Treasurer from 1983-1986 and as the President in 1991-1992.

James Ashton-Miller

James Ashton-Miller

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Michigan

James A. Ashton-Miller, Ph.D., is an Associate Vice President for Research for the University of Michigan (U-M) and the Albert Schultz Collegiate Research Professor and Distinguished Research Scientist in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering & Internal Medicine, the Institute of Gerontology, and the School of Kinesiology at U-M. He directs the Biomechanics Research Laboratory where he has worked since 1983. His research focuses on the prevention of unintentional injuries across the age span – from birth-related injuries in women and their sequelae, ACL injuries, spine biomechanics, to fall-related injuries in the elderly. He and his students use computer simulations, validated by experiment, to gain insights into the mechanics of injuries so they can be better prevented. He has authored 220 publications with an h-index of 40. He has graduated 28 doctoral students and mentors K08, K12 and K23 awardees. He has served on NIH study sections and review panels in six different countries. His research has been recognized by over a dozen national and international awards, including ASB’s Borelli Award. He is a past-President of the ASB, chaired the 2008 North American Congress on Biomechanics, and is a fellow of ASME, AIMBE, ASB and GSA. He really enjoys his family, playing the guitar, trail running and cross-country skiing.

Joan Bechtold

Joan Bechtold

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Minnesota

Dr. Bechtold currently serves at the University of Minnesota as Research Vice-Chair and Gustilo Professor of Orthopaedic Research in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate Professor in Biomedical Engineering, and is member of the Medical School Research Council. She is also Senior Investigator at the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute and Excelen Center for Bone and Joint Research and Education, in Minneapolis. Bechtold’s main research focus is on improving bone healing in the face of comorbidities, beginning with the bone-implant interface in revision joint replacement, for which she has been funded by the NIH since 1995. With NIH, DoD and Orthopaedic Trauma Association support, she investigates bone healing in musculoskeletal infection and trauma, and recently was awarded CDMRP funding for Osseointegration Program research into improving skin-implant interface in amputations. In addition to ASB, she is a Fellow of AIMBE, the Orthopaedic Research Society and the International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies. She has served as President of the Orthopaedic Research Society, as President and as Secretary/Treasurer of the American Society of Biomechanics. and has served as Permanent and ad hoc member of various NIH Study Sections. She recently completed a 4-year assignment as member of the NIAMS Director’s Advisory Council. She takes a special interest in mentoring first generation college students in STEM fields.

Andrew Biewener

Andrew Biewener

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: Harvard University

Andrew A. Biewener received his BS degree in Zoology from Duke University, NC, USA in 1974 and his MA and PhD in Biology from Harvard University, MA, USA in 1982. His academic appointments include being an Instructor (1982-84), Assistant Professor (1984-90), and Professor (1990-1998) at the University of Chicago, where he also served as Chair of the Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy from 1996-98. He then assumed the Charles P. Lyman Professorship in Biology at Harvard University in 1998 and is the Director of the Concord Field Station. He holds both of these appointments at present. He also served as Chair of the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology from 2001 to 2010 and was President of the American Society of Biomechanics in 2001–2002.

In addition to his academic appointments, Biewener began as an Editor with The Journal of Experimental Biology in 2001 and has been Deputy Editor-in-Chief since 2005. He also serves as an Editorial Board member of Biological Letters, having served previously as an Editorial Board member for the Journal of Morphology, Acta Anatomica, Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, and the Journal of Experimental Zoology. Biewener has served as an ad hoc member and is now a regular member of the NIH Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation Sciences (MRS) study section, in addition to having served on several NSF grant panels. Biewener’s laboratory currently focuses on the biomechanics and neuromechanical control of terrestrial and aerial locomotion of vertebrate animals, with relevance to gait rehabilitation and biorobotics, having previously studied skeletal mechanics and remodeling. He has published over 129 primary research papers, has trained 14 PhDs and 15 post-doctoral fellows, and now is primary advisor for four PhD trainees and 3 post-doctoral trainees.

Thomas D. Brown

Thomas D. Brown

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Iowa

Thomas D. Brown, Ph.D., is appointed as the Richard and Janice Johnston Chair of Orthopaedic Biomechanics at the University of Iowa, where he has served on the faculty of the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation since 1983. After completing graduate study at Carnegie-Mellon University (M.S. 1973, Ph.D. 1976, in mechanical engineering-bioengineering), he spent nine years on the Orthopaedic Surgery faculty at the University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Brown’s research has been in the field of orthopaedic biomechanics, and includes more than 280 archival journal publications. Much of this work has involved computational mechanics, particularly finite element analysis. Areas of particular focus have been joint replacement, intra-articular fractures, osteonecrosis, post-traumatic arthritis, and carpal tunnel syndrome. He has supervised nineteen Ph.D. theses and approximately fifty M.S. theses. He has been principal investigator on eighteen R01-level grants from NIH and other federal agencies. Honors include a Kappa Delta Award from AAOS/ORS, the Nicolas Andry award from ABJS, the Clinical Research Award (three times) from OREF, and the Giovanni Borelli Award from ASB. He has been active in many professional societies, particularly ORS and ASB, for both of which he is a past president. He served four years as a regular member of the NIH orthopaedic study section. He has performed extensive review, editorial board, and professional service work, including presently serving as Deputy Editor for Research of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Tom Buchanan

Tom Buchanan

Fellow Since: 2014

Current Affiliation: University of Delaware

Thomas S. Buchanan is the George W. Laird Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Delaware. He received a BS from UCSD in Applied Mechanics & Engineering Sciences (Bioengineering) and a PhD in Theoretical & Applied Mechanics from Northwestern University. After doing a post-doc at MIT in Brain & Cognitive Sciences, he was given a faculty appointment back at Northwestern in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and had a lab at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. From there he moved to the University of Delaware’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and became Director of the Center for Biomechanical Engineering Research. He also served as Academic Director of UD’s interdisciplinary Biomechanics & Movement Science graduate program. Buchanan served as Chairman of UD’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and as Deputy Dean of the College of Engineering before being appointed the inaugural Director of the Delaware Rehabilitation Institute. Outside of UD, he has served as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Biomechanics and as President of the American Society of Biomechanics. Buchanan holds the rank of Fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Dr. Buchanan has been principal investigator or co-PI on over $50 million of NIH research grants. His research focuses on the neural control of joint stability and musculoskeletal models of muscle and joint forces with applications to osteoarthritis, stroke and sports medicine.

Peter Cavanagh

Peter Cavanagh

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Washington

Peter Cavanagh is an Endowed Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. He was born, raised, and educated in England, and did graduate studies in human biomechanics at the Royal Free Medical School at the University of London. He is past President of both the American Society of Biomechanics and the International Society of Biomechanics and has received the Borelli Award and Muybridge Medal from these societies. He has also been the recipient of the International Diabetic Foot Award, the Edward J. Olmos Award for Amputation prevention, The Dyson Award, and the Lawrence Young NSBRI Award. When not working, he enjoys reading, running, listening to music, and photographing birds in flight. He is married to artist Ann Vandervelde. They have four children and five grandchildren.

Don B. Chaffin

Don B. Chaffin

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Michigan

Don B. Chaffin is the R.G. Snyder Distinguished University Professor (Emeritus 2008) in Industrial and Operations Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan. He received his B.S. from GMI (now Kettering University) in 1962, his M.S. from the University of Toledo in 1964, and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1967, all in industrial engineering. Chaffin served as chair of the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering from 1977 to 1981 and as director of the Center for Ergonomics from 1981 to 1998. During the period he served on both a NIOSH Study Section and on the NIOSH Board of Scientific Counselors. He also was appointed by the Secretary of Labor to serve on the National Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health.

His research has resulted in six books, more than 140 peer-reviewed journal articles, and more than 300 proceedings papers, book chapters, and reports. He and his graduate students and staff have developed a set of widely used software programs to assist engineers who are involved in designing workplaces and vehicles to ensure that people do not suffer overexertion injuries during the performance of manual tasks. In 1998, Chaffin founded the University of Michigan Human Motion Simulation Laboratory in the Center for Ergonomics, which he directed until his retirement in 2007. His work has resulted in his election to Fellow status in six international professional and scientific organizations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Chaffin has received many national and international awards for his teaching, research, and service and was elected to membership in the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 1994. In 2008, he received the National Engineering Award from the American Association of Engineering Societies for his lifetime achievements and leadership in the field of ergonomics.

Li-Shan Chou

Li-Shan Chou

Fellow Since: 2019

Current Affiliation: Iowa State University

Li-Shan Chou is a professor and chair in Department of Kinesiology at the Iowa State University. He received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from Tatung Institute of Technology in Taiwan, and subsequently earned his MS and Ph.D. degrees, both in Mechanical Engineering, from University of Illinois at Chicago. He has served on the faculty of University of Oregon for 19 years before joining ISU in 2019.

His interdisciplinary research investigates underlying mechanisms of mobility/balance impairments associated with ageing, musculoskeletal diseases and injuries, and traumatic brain injury. Over his academic career, he has received extramural funding from the NIH, CDC, DOD, and Oregon Medical Research Foundation. Up to date, he has mentored 16 PhDs and many maters and undergraduate students, and his team published more than 110 peer-reviewed papers. His teaching is in the areas of biomechanical analysis of human movement, orthopedic biomechanics, and rehabilitation engineering. He serves as the Associate Editor and Section Editor to Gait and Posture and Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, respectively, as well as the president of the ISB 3D Analysis of Human Movement Technical Group.

John Challis

John Challis

Fellow Since: 2015

Current Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University

John Challis received both his B.Sc (Hons) and PhD from Loughborough University of Technology, England. He then was a lecturer in Human Biomechanics at the University of Birmingham before moving to Penn State University. He is past President of both the American Society of Biomechanics and the International Society of Biomechanics. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Kinesiology. His research focuses on the coordination and function of the musculo-skeletal system. John is a Professor at Penn State University where he is the director of the Biomechanics Laboratory.

Joseph J. (Trey) Crisco

Joseph J. (Trey) Crisco

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: Brown University

Joseph J. (Trey) Crisco III, Ph.D. is the Henry Frederick Lippitt Professor of Orthopaedic Research, Department of Orthopaedics, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital.

Prof. Crisco earned his B.A. in Mathematics and Fine Art from Amherst College and his Ph.D. in Engineering and Applied Science from Yale University. Prof. Crisco’s research interests are in musculoskeletal bioengineering, where he has developed advanced imaging modalities for the study of in vivo joint mechanics, researched spine biomechanics, injury prevention in sports, and toy systems for use in pediatric rehabilitation. His work has been primarily funded by the NIH and resulted in 148 peer-reviewed publications and 214 abstracts. He serves as the Editor-In-Chief of Journal of Applied Biomechanics, on NIH study sections, the scientific advisory committees of US Lacrosse and USA Baseball, and as an advisor to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as to residents. He has taught joint courses with the School of Engineering at Brown and the Industrial Design Department at Rhode Island School of Design.

Prof. Crisco attended his first ASB meeting in 1987 and has been a steady regular since. During the stormy banquet cruise of the 13th ASB meeting in Burlington,VT he was an engineering consult for keg stabilization on the Lake Champlain Ferry. That role led him to the Chair of the Membership Committee (1995-1998), Program Chair (2000), President (2005) and Meeting Chair (2010). He is a past recipient of the Postdoctoral Young Scientist Award (1993).

Irene Davis

Irene Davis

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: Harvard University

Dr. Davis received a BS in Exercise Science from the University of Massachusetts, and in Physical Therapy from the University of Florida. She earned an MS in Biomechanics from the University of Virginia, and PhD in Biomechanics from Pennsylvania State University. She is an Emeritus Professor at the University of Delaware and is currently in the Department of PM&R at Harvard Medical School, and the founding Director of the Spaulding National Running Center.

Dr. Davis studies the relationship between lower extremity structure, mechanics and injury in runners. Areas of focus have included mechanical factors in knee osteoarthritis, tibial stress fractures, plantar fasciitis and patellofemoral disorders. She has been investigating ways to retrain faulty gait patterns associated with these conditions with the use of real-time feedback. She has received funding from the DOD and the NIH to support her research. Dr. Davis has given over 300 lectures both nationally and internationally and authored over 100 publications. She is a Past-President of ASB, and a Fellow of the ACSM and the APTA. Irene lives in Boston with her husband and enjoys all things outdoors, spending time with her family and escaping to her cottage in the dunes of the Cape.

Scott Delp

Scott Delp

Fellow Since: 2012

Current Affiliation: Stanford University

Scott Delp graduated Sum Cum Laude with a B.S in Mechanical Engineering from Colorado State University in 1983. He worked in Hewlett Packard’s computer graphics group before beginning graduate school at Stanford University in 1985. Delp received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford and in 1990 joined the faculty of Northwestern University. He returned to Stanford in 1999, and in 2002 became the founding Chairman of Stanford’s Bioengineering Department.

Professor Delp’s work draws on computational mechanics, biomedical imaging, and neuromuscular biology to improve treatments for individuals with physical disabilities. He has led the development of software systems (SIMM and OpenSim) that enable simulation of human and animal movements; these software systems have become the platform for an international collaboration involving hundreds of research centers. Delp invented technology and holds fundamental patents in surgical navigation, microendoscopy, and optogenetics. Delp has received numerous awards for his work, including a National Young Investigator Award from NSF and a Technology Reinvestment Award for which he was honored by President Clinton at the White House. He is currently the James H. Clark Professor of Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Orthopaedic Surgery at Stanford University.

Paul DeVita

Paul DeVita

Fellow Since: 2012

Current Affiliation: East Carolina University

Dr. DeVita has been investigating the biomechanics and motor control of human locomotion for the past 25+ years. He has published in the areas of ACL injury, aging, knee osteoarthritis, obesity, and locomotion in healthy people.

Dr. DeVita has been most fortunate to work with and learn from superb colleagues, most notably Tibor Hortobagyi and Steve Messier. Both of these noted scientists have taught much about the science of human movement to Dr. DeVita and he is very grateful to them.

Dr. DeVita served on the Executive Board for the American Society of Biomechanics and on several study sections for the NIH but most often with Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Sciences. He has been associate editor for the Journal of Applied Biomechanics and Exercise and Sport Science and he is also a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. He is also a member of the International Society of Biomechanics and the National Academy of Kinesiology.

Once in a while he says something funny.

Dr. DeVita has been around the block:
B.A. Biology, State University of New York at Binghamton, 1977
M.S. Biomechanics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, 1984
Ph.D. Biomechanics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, 1986

Roger M. Enoka

Roger M. Enoka

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Colorado

Roger M. Enoka completed undergraduate training in physical education at the University of Otago in New Zealand (1968-1970) prior to obtaining an MS degree in biomechanics and a PhD in kinesiology from the University of Washington in Seattle (1974-1981). He has held faculty positions in the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences and the Department of Physiology at the University of Arizona in Tucson (1981-1993) and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (1993-1996). He is currently professor of Integrative Physiology at the University of Colorado Boulder and has joint appointments in the Department of Neurology and the Division of Geriatrics at the Anschutz Medical Campus of the University of Colorado Denver. His research focuses on the neuromuscular mechanisms that mediate acute adjustments and chronic adaptations in response to physical activity performed by humans.

Mark D. Grabiner

Mark D. Grabiner

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Illinois Chicago

Mark Grabiner is a professor in Kinesiology & Nutrition and a professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the director of the Clinical Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Laboratory. He earned his doctorate from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and has served on the faculties of the University of Southern California in the Department of Exercise Science, and then at The Cleveland Clinic in the Department of Biomedical Engineering before joining UIC in 2001.

He has published over 135 refereed publications and has contributed to 10 books. His interdisciplinary research, which has received federal, industry and foundation funding, involves characterizing the modifiable mechanisms underlying falls and injuries by older adults, and translating these findings to the design, development and deployment of clinically-relevant technologies and interventions. He is a fellow of the American Society of Biomechanics, the Gerontological Society of America, the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Academy of Kinesiology. He is presently on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Sports Medicine , the editorial consultant panel for the Journal of Biomechanics and is an associate editor for Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. He has served as the president of the American Society of Biomechanics, a member of the executive Council of the International Society of Biomechanics, and a member of the World Council on Biomechanics.

Robert J. Gregor

Robert J. Gregor

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Southern California

Graduating from the Penn State Biomechanics Lab in 1976, Dr. Gregor’s research interests in skeletal muscle physiology and mechanics led him to a faculty position at UCLA in the Department of Kinesiology. On faculty for 20 years at UCLA Dr. Gregor focused on the use of skeletal muscle as a resource to the nervous system in movement control. Taking a position at the Georgia Tech in 1993 his lab focused on sensorimotor integration, neural control and movement biomechanics using both animal and human models. Dr. Gregor retired as Professor Emeritus from Georgia Tech in 2008 and currently holds a faculty position in the Department of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy at USC.

Regarding the ASB, Dr. Gregor served as a member of the Executive Board (1993-4, 1995-8), as Program Chair for the Annual Meeting at Ohio State (1994), as Meeting Chair for the Annual Meeting at Georgia Tech (1996) and as President (1996-7). He has recently been voted to the level of Fellow Emeritus effective 2012. In addition, Dr. Gregor was the Founding Chair of the School of Applied Physiology at Georgia Tech, is a Fellow Emeritus in ACSM, Founding Editor of the Journal of Applied Biomechanics and served as Co-Chairman of the Organizing Committee, XIIth International Congress of Biomechanics, UCLA (1989).

Melissa Gross

Melissa Gross

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Michigan

Melissa Gross is an Associate Professor in the School of Kinesiology at the University of Michigan. She is interested in musculoskeletal structure and emergent movement behavior. Her interests are broad and interdisciplinary. She has collaborated with scientists in geriatrics and epidemiology to investigate the effects of exercise programs on functional ability in the elderly and the onset of functional decline in mid-aged women. Prof. Gross has also conducted studies ranging from the role of the spinal cord in controlling rhythmic limb movements in the cat to the effect of pelvic morphology on locomotor behavior in Neandertals. Currently, she directs the Behavioral Biomechanics Lab in the School of Kinesiology at the University of Michigan where she and her students are investigating the effect of emotion on body movements. The research in her lab aims to understand how human movement patterns are changed in characteristic ways when different emotions are expressed in healthy individuals and individuals with depression.

Gross served on the ASB Executive Board nearly continuously from 1989-2002, as Secretary/Treasurer (89-92), Membership Committee Chair (92-95), Program Chair (97-98), and President (99-00). She also created the foundational archive for the first 25 years of ASB activities; this archive continues to be updated today.

Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles, Kinesiology 1984
M.S., University of California Los Angeles, Kinesiology 1979
B.A., University of Colorado, Dance 1976

Ted Gross

Ted Gross

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Washington

Ted Gross is currently a Professor and the Sigvard T. Hansen, Jr. Endowed Chair in the Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine at the University of Washington. His research has consistently mixed engineering and biology, but in different proportions over time (more recently trending toward biology). His group at UW, the Orthopaedic Science Laboratories, is a multi-faculty, multi-disciplinary group with a flat organizational structure (i.e., they dynamically form groups of varied composition for a given project) that explores how bone and bone cells respond to mechanical stimuli in normal and pathological situations. The 1985 ASB meeting in Ann Arbor was the first scientific society meeting Ted attended.

Joseph Hamill

Joseph Hamill

Fellow Since: 2017

Current Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Joseph Hamill is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He received a B.A. from York University (Toronto), a B.S. from Concordia University (Montreal) and M.S. and PhD degrees from the University of Oregon. Joe was a faculty member in Kinesiology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst for 31 years after serving on the faculty at Southern Illinois University for four years. He served as Department Chair of Kinesiology for 11 years and as Associate Dean of Research in the School of Public Health and Health Sciences for five years. He is also an Honorary Professor at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland), an Adjunct Professor at the University of Limerick (Ireland), at Staffordshire University (England) and the University of Ostrava (Czech Republic), a Distinguished Research Professor at Republic Polytechnic (Singapore) and a Staff Scientist at the Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Springfield, MA. Dr. Hamill has authored over 180 research articles, over 200 proceedings and abstracts, three books and 22 book chapters and has made more than 250 research presentations at regional, national, and international professional meetings.

Dr. Hamill is an active member of the American Society of Biomechanics (Fellow), the American College of Sports Medicine (Fellow), the International Society of Biomechanics, the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports (Fellow), the Canadian Society of Biomechanics (Fellow), and the National Academy of Kinesiology (Fellow). He is currently President of the International Society of Biomechanics (2017-19) and formally President of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports (2012-14). He has served on the Editorial Board of Clinical Biomechanics, Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise, Sports Biomechanics, Exercise and Sports Science Review, Gait & Posture and Journal of Foot and Ankle Research as well as acted as an ad hoc reviewer for many professional journals.

Dr. Hamill studies the coordination and control of lower extremity segments during human locomotion. His research has addressed functional variability from a dynamical systems perspective in both healthy and pathological gait. His aim is to determine risk factors for overuse running injuries. He has been funded for his research by several federal agencies in addition to private industry.

Chris J. Hass

Chris J. Hass

Fellow Since: 2019

Current Affiliation: University of Florida

Chris J. Hass, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology and the Norman Fixel Institute for Neurological Diseases at the University of Florida. He is also the Associate Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs. Dr. Hass holds a BS in Biology and Exercise Science from Furman University. He received his MS in Exercise Physiology and a PhD in Biomechanics both from the University of Florida.

Chris has been an ASB member since 1999, when he joined as a PhD student. Chris has served ASB most notably as the Meeting Co-Chair (2012) and President (2015-2018). He has also contributed to Program, Education, and Membership Committees. He is also a member and fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Dr. Hass’s work is focused on understanding how, within the constraints of the musculoskeletal system, sensory organs, motor pattern generators, and the brain interact to produce coordinated movement. Two prominent themes of this work are: 1) elucidating the biological bases of walking and balance impairment in persons with Movement Disorders (e.g. Parkinson’s disease (PD), Essential Tremor, Ataxia) so that therapeutic interventions can be optimized; and 2) delineating basic mechanisms of neuromechanical control governing locomotor functions. The Michael J. Fox Foundation, NSF, and the NIH have all funded his research.

Walter Herzog

Walter Herzog

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Calgary

Dr. Herzog received his undergraduate training in Physical Education at the Federal Technical Institute in Zurich, Switzerland (1979), completed his doctoral research in biomechanics at the University of Iowa (USA) in 1985, and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Neuroscience and Biomechanics in Calgary, Canada in 1987. Currently, he is a Professor of Biomechanics with appointments in Kinesiology, Medicine, Engineering, and Veterinary Medicine, holds the Canada Research Chair for Cellular and Molecular Biomechanics, and is appointed the Killam Memorial Chair for Inter-Disciplinary Research at the University of Calgary.

Dr. Herzog’s research interests are in neuro-musculoskeletal biomechanics with emphasis on mechanisms of muscle contraction and the biomechanics of joints with focus on mechanisms of onset and progression of osteoarthritis. Dr. Herzog is the recipient of the Borelli Award from the American Society of Biomechanics, the Career Award from the Canadian Society for Biomechanics and is the past president of the International, American and Canadian Societies for Biomechanics.

Elizabeth T. Hsiao-Wecksler

Elizabeth T. Hsiao-Wecksler

Fellow Since: 2018

Current Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Elizabeth T. Hsiao-Wecksler, PhD, is a Professor and Willett Faculty Scholar in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), and Affiliate Professor in the Carle Illinois College of Medicine, Neuroscience Program, Beckman Institute, and departments of Bioengineering and Industrial & Enterprise Systems Engineering. Recent work has been supported by the NSF, NIH, and US Dept. of Homeland Security, which have led to 12 patents or invention disclosures. She directs the Human Dynamics and Controls Laboratory (HDCL), which uses methods from musculoskeletal biomechanics, control theory, mechatronics, fluid power, and soft robotics to investigate and improve movement control and function related to locomotion biomechanics and assistive device design. Her group has developed improved signal processing methods to quantify movement patterns, such as those during gait and wheelchair propulsion, and pioneered novel designs for pneumatically powered ankle-foot orthoses and multi-geared wheels for manual wheelchairs.

Prof. Hsiao-Wecksler is an advocate for diversity, inclusion, and mentoring. She was the first female mechanical engineering faculty member tenured and promoted in her department, which now boasts over 20% women faculty members. She was a co-founder of GALAXe (Gays and Lesbians at Xerox) and QUEST (Queers in Engineering, Science and Technology) at UC Berkeley, and has been an active member of UIUC’s Chancellor and Provost Committee on LGBTQ Concerns. She is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Associate Editor for the ASME Journal of Medical Devices, and 2018 recipient of the Distinguished Engineering Educator Award by the Society of Women Engineers.

Liz has been a member of ASB since 1996, was the 2012 Program Chair, has been a member of multiple ASB committees over the years, and participated in a number of tutorials including the first Junior Faculty Mentoring Workshop. She is particularly proud that a large number of her PhD, MS, and BS students (and their academic progeny) are continual participants at ASB annual meetings, where they get together for HDCL picture events.

Richard Hughes

Richard Hughes

Fellow Since: 2016

Current Affiliation: University of Michigan

Richard E. Hughes, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Biomedical Engineering, and Industrial & Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan. He directs the Laboratory for Optimization and Computation in Orthopaedic Surgery and is co-director of the Michigan Arthroplasty Registry Collaborative Quality Initiative (MARCQI). MARCQI is a statewide effort to improve the quality of care for total hip and knee replacement patients consisting of 59 hospitals and over 400 surgeons. He has served as president of the American Society of Biomechanics. He has published over 95 peer-reviewed papers and has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and Whitaker Foundation. He enjoys experiencing biomechanics as a recreational rower. He is proud that his students have gone to a wide range of fun and fulfilling careers, ranging from university professor, full-time mother, and Cirque du Soleil acrobat.

Andrew Karduna

Andrew Karduna

Fellow Since: 2018

Current Affiliation: University of Oregon

Originally from New York, Andy did his undergraduate work at MIT, receiving a BS in Mechanical Engineering (1989). For graduate studies, he earned his MS from Johns Hopkins (1991) and his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania (1995), both in Biomedical Engineering. Andy has been a Professor in the Department of Human Physiology at the University of Oregon since 2002. He currently has a half time appointment as the Associate Dean of the Graduate School. Prior to that, he was a faculty member the department of Physical Therapy at Drexel University (1996-2002).

His primary research focus is the general area of upper extremity biomechanics. Over his academic career, he have received extramural funding from the NIH, CDC, Oregon Medical Research Foundation, Whitaker Foundation, NSF, American Physical Therapy Association, Foundation for Physical Therapy, and the Arthritis Foundation. He is an active member of ISB’s International Shoulder Group and is a co-author of the upper extremity standard published in 2005. In his spare time, he is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Biomechanics.

His first ASB event was the NACOB meeting in Waterloo in 1998 and since then has only missed one meeting (sorry Boulder). He has served on the Executive Board as Newsletter Editor (2004-2006), Communications Chair (2006-2009), and Secretary/Membership Chair (2012-2015). He is also an active member of the regional Northwest Biomechanics Symposium group, having co-hosted the meeting at the University of Oregon in 2008, 2012 and 2017.

Kenton R. Kaufman

Kenton R. Kaufman

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: Mayo Clinic

Dr. Kenton R. Kaufman is the W. Hall Wendel Jr Musculoskeletal Research Professor, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Director of the Biomechanics-Motion Analysis Laboratory, and Consultant in the Departments of Orthopedic Surgery, Physiology and Biomedical Engineering at Mayo Clinic. He is a registered professional engineer. Dr. Kaufman’s primary area of research is musculoskeletal rehabilitation science. He is the co-inventor of the SensorWalk, a stance-control orthosis on the commercial market. He has had research funding totaling over $40 million, has published over 180 scientific peer-reviewed papers, and holds 4 US patents and one international patent.

Dr. Kaufman has received numerous awards including the American Society of Biomechanics Young Investigator Award, Excellence in Research Award and the O’Donoghue Sports Injury Research Award from the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine, Clinical Research Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Best Scientific Paper Awards from the Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society, Frank Stinchfield Award from The Hip Society, and the John Insall Award from The Knee Society.

He has served as a reviewer for NIH, CDC, NIDRR and the VA. Currently, he is serving on the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research at NIH. Dr. Kaufman is a Past President of the American Society of Biomechanics. He is also a founding member and Past President of the Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society. He is a Fellow in the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Society of Biomechanics.

Rodger Kram

Rodger Kram

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Colorado

Rodger Kram , Ph.D. is an associate professor in the Integrative Physiology Dept. at the University of Colorado Boulder. He earned a B.A. in Biology at Northwestern University, M.S. at Penn State, Ph.D. in Biology from Harvard in 1991 and was a post-doc then assistant professor at Berkeley until 2000. His primary research interest is the biomechanical basis for the energetic cost of locomotion. He studies basic scientific aspects of walking and running in healthy, young people, and how obesity, aging and prosthetics affect locomotion energetics and mechanics.

Dr. Kram has published over 60 peer-reviewed research articles and has studied more than 40 animal species ranging from ants to antelopes to elephants. Although he mostly studies human locomotion now, he still gets to study some pretty cool animals (e.g. turtles and crocodiles). One of his greatest prides is that all of Ph.D. students and post-docs are gainfully employed in science and most are tenure track faculty at major research universities. Dr. Kram was elected and served as president of the American Society of Biomechanics in 2008.

Rick Lieber

Rick Lieber

Fellow Since: 2012

Current Affiliation: University of California San Diego

Rick Lieber earned his Ph.D. in Biophysics from U.C. Davis in 1982 developing a theory of light diffraction that was applied to mechanical studies of single muscle cells. He joined the faculty of U.C. San Diego in 1985 where he has spent his entire academic career and is now Professor and Vice-Chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.

Dr. Lieber’s work is characterized by its interdisciplinary nature—an approach that is relevant to those who study biomechanics and Orthopaedic Surgery. He has published almost 200 articles in journals ranging from the very basic such as The Biophysical Journal and The Journal of Cell Biology to those more applied such as The Journal of Hand Surgery and Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. More recently, he has implemented molecular biology tools to understand gene expression patterns in muscles subjected to high stress and in performing mechanistic studies of muscles in which genes are introduced to muscles in an attempt to change their mechanical function.

In recognition of the clinical impact of his basic science studies, Dr. Lieber has been honored by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (Kappa Delta Award), the American Bone and Joint Surgeons (Nicolas Andry Award) the American College of Sports Medicine (Fellow), and the Council for the International Exchange of Scholars (Fulbright Fellowship) and the American Society for Biomechanics (Borelli Award). His research laboratory is supported primarily by grants from the Department of Veterans Affairs and National Institutes of Health. Dr. Lieber is currently the director of the National Skeletal Muscle Research Center and the San Diego Skeletal Muscle Research Center, both based at U.C. San Diego.

Philip E. Martin

Philip E. Martin

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: Iowa State University

Philip E. Martin is Professor and Chair of the Department of Kinesiology at Iowa State University. Phil received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his Ph.D. from Penn State University. He was a faculty member at Arizona State University for 19 years and was chair of the department from 1992-94 and 2000-02 before moving to Penn State in 2002, where he was head of the Department of Kinesiology for five years. Phil’s research activities have addressed mechanical factors influencing the economy and efficiency of walking, running, and cycling; decrements in the mechanics and economy of walking in the elderly; and kinematic and kinetic determinants of walking and running patterns in below knee amputees. He has authored 80 research articles and book chapters and has made more than 150 research presentations at regional, national, and international professional meetings.

Phil is an active member of American Society of Biomechanics (Fellow), American College of Sports Medicine (Fellow), International Society of Biomechanics, National Academy of Kinesiology (Fellow), and Board of Directors and Executive Board of the American Kinesiology Association. He is currently President elect of the NAK (2011-12) and Vice President of the AKA. He has also served as President of the ASB (1994-95), Secretary-Treasurer of NAK (2006-08), Associate Editor for Journal of Applied Biomechanics (1997-2005), and Biomechanics Section Editor forResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (1990-93). He has also been a member of the Research Review Committee for ACSM (1991-94), the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Sport Biomechanics (1988-91), and the Scientific Advisory Committee for the U.S. Olympic Committee Sports Medicine Council (1986-88).

Jill L. McNitt-Gray

Jill L. McNitt-Gray

Fellow Since: 2013

Current Affiliation: University of Southern California

Jill L. McNitt-Gray, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Departments of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Southern California. She is also the Director of the USC Biomechanics Research Laboratory and was the founding director of a cross-cutting interdisciplinary graduate program in biological sciences at USC. In 1980, she earned her undergraduate degree in mathematics and statistics with a certification in coaching from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. After working in load research and load management for the American Electric Power Service Corporation, she returned to graduate school at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In 1985, she earned her master’s degree in biomechanics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and was the assistant coach of the Carolina Women’s Gymnastics team. Dr. McNitt-Gray received her doctoral degree in biomechanics from Penn State in 1989.

Dr. McNitt-Gray has served on the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Sports Biomechanics and the Journal of Applied Biomechanics and as an ad hoc reviewer on study sections for NIH, NSF, CDC, and various governing bodies of sport. She served on the ASB membership committee from 1989-92, and then as a member of the education committee. Dr. McNitt-Gray has served on the Executive Board as Education Chair (1993-95), Program Chair (2002), and as President (2009-2012). Dr. McNitt-Gray also served as a member of the Executive Council of the ISB from 2001 to 2007 and served as the ISB Liaison to Affiliated and Economically Developing Societies. Dr. McNitt-Gray has received the USC Mellon Culture of Mentoring Award for her work with the Women in Science and Engineering program (WiSE) and a USC Mellon Mentoring award for her mentoring of undergraduate students. The Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee recognized her research team’s work in the physical sciences with the Prince Alexandre de Merode Award. Dr. McNitt-Gray is also actively involved in translation of science into the practice and outreach programs that provide informal educational experiences in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics fields. Her innovative approaches to research and education have been recognized by the USC Center for Excellence in Teaching and funded by the National Science Foundation. She has served as a biomechanist for the International Olympic Committee, the US Olympic Committee, multiple National Governing Bodies of Sport, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

Dr. McNitt-Gray’s interdisciplinary research focuses on the neuromuscular control and dynamics of human movements and aims to identify risk factors and develop effective methods for performance enhancement for individuals with various ability levels (clinical populations as well as elite athletes). She uses both experimental and dynamic modeling approaches to test research hypotheses specific to control priorities during physically demanding well-practiced tasks.

Richard Neptune

Richard Neptune

Fellow Since: 2016

Current Affiliation: The University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Richard R. Neptune earned his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Davis and currently directs the Neuromuscular Biomechanics Lab at UT Austin. His research integrates musculoskeletal modeling, computer simulation and experimental analyses to identify the neuromotor and biomechanical mechanisms that contribute to locomotor impairments in those with movement disabilities including lower-limb amputees, stroke patients and wheelchair users. He is also involved in research aimed at improving the performance of orthotic and prosthetic devices using advanced additive manufacturing techniques. His research has been supported primarily by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs, National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health. He has received the American Society of Biomechanics Young Scientist Award and CAREER award from the National Science Foundation. He is also the recipient of the Da Vinci Award from the Engineering Society of Detroit and National Multiple Sclerosis Society. He has received the Joe and Bettie Branson Ward Endowed Excellence Award from The University of Texas at Austin for his teaching and research that has contributed to changes of positive value to society and the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Award for Excellence in Engineering Teaching. He is currently the Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and holds the John T. MacGuire Professorship in Mechanical Engineering.

Maury Nussbaum

Maury Nussbaum

Fellow Since: 2018

Current Affiliation: Virginia Tech

Maury A. Nussbaum is the HG Prillaman Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISE) at Virginia Tech in beautiful Blacksburg, VA. He received his PhD in Industrial and Operations Engineering from The University of Michigan, where he also completed a two-year post-doctoral position. His research covers a variety of areas within the fields of occupational biomechanics, work physiology, and ergonomics, with primary goals of understanding and preventing the causes of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and occupational slips/trips/falls and enhancing working efficiency. His main research interests include: low-back and shoulder biomechanics, exposure assessment, fall prevention, localized muscle fatigue, aging and obesity effects on physical capacity and injury risk, product design and evaluation, and applied electromyography. He has published over 190 papers in peer-reviewed journals, and directed over $5.8Million in funded research projects. He is a fellow of the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors, the American Industrial Hygiene Association, the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers, and the International Ergonomics Association.

Stacie I Ringleb

Stacie I Ringleb

Fellow Since: 2020

Current Affiliation: Old Dominion University

Dr. Ringleb is a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Old Dominion University. She earned her B.S. in biomedical engineering from Case Western Research University, a M.S.E. in mechanical engineering from Temple University and her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Drexel University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Orthopedic Biomechanics Lab at the Mayo Clinic.

She has been studying the foot and ankle since graduate school, but occasionally investigates spines, knees, and upper extremities, as well as working on a variety of rehabilitation projects with augmented reality, in collaboration with small businesses. Recently, Dr. Ringleb has started to investigate how engineering students collaborating with education students in a service-learning project affects undergraduate STEM education and the intent and abilities of education students to teach engineering. Finally, Dr. Ringleb collaborates with the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority to bring small satellite design into K-12 education as well as the college classroom. Dr. Ringleb has been a member of the American Society of Biomechanics since 2000, and had the privilege of serving as the secretary and chair of the membership committed from 2015-2018.

Mary M. Rodgers

Mary M. Rodgers

Fellow Since: 2012

Current Affiliation: University of Maryland

Mary M. Rodgers, PT, PhD, FAPTA, FASB, FISB, is Professor Emerita at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science. She earned her BSPT and MS from the University of North Carolina, and her PhD in Biomechanics/Exercise Science from The Pennsylvania State University. She joined the Maryland faculty in 1994 and served as department chair for 15 years. Dr. Rodgers is currently senior consultant for the Maryland Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center funded by the National Institute of Aging and Associate Editor for the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation journal where she has served since 2003.

An ASB member since 1984, Dr. Rodgers served on the Nominating Committee (88-89) and the Executive Board (89-93 & 95-97), was the first chair of the Education Committee (89-93) and was Program Chair (95-97). In addition to ASB, she is a Fellow of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) and the American Physical Therapy Association. In addition to serving as a member of the ISB Executive Council for 10 years (97-07), Dr. Rodgers also served as ISB President. Dr. Rodgers has held a number of research and education advisory positions including serving as Senior Advisor for the National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH for eight years. Dr. Rodgers’ primary research focus has been on rehabilitation biomechanics, specifically investigating the relationship between manual wheelchair propulsion biomechanics and the development of upper extremity overuse injuries. Her research work has been funded primarily by the VA and NIH where she continues to provide ad hoc grant reviews.

Nick Stergiou

Nick Stergiou

Fellow Since: 2017

Current Affiliation: University of Nebraska, Omaha

Dr. Nick Stergiou is the Distinguished Community Research Chair in Biomechanics and Professor as well as the Director of the Biomechanics Research Building and the Center for Research in Human Movement Variability at the University of Nebraska at Omaha where his primary appointment is. Recently he was also appointed as the Assistant Dean of the Division of Biomechanics and Research Development. He is the Founding Chair of the first ever academic Department of Biomechanics that graduates students with a BS in Biomechanics. His secondary appointment is as a Professor of the Department of Environmental, Agricultural, and Occupational Health of the College of Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. His research focuses on understanding variability inherent in human movement and he is an international authority in the study of Nonlinear Dynamics. He has been inducted to the National Academy of Kinesiology and as a Fellow to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. Stergiou’s research spans from infant development to older adult fallers, and has impacted training techniques of surgeons and treatment and rehabilitation of pathologies, such as peripheral arterial disease. He has received more 30 million dollars in personal funding from NIH, NASA, NSF, the NIDRR/US Department of Education, and many other agencies and foundations. He has received the largest grant in the history of his University, a NIH P20 grant that was worth 10.1 million dollars. This grant allowed him to develop the Center for Research in Human Movement Variability. He has also several inventions and has procured a private donation of $6 million to build the 23,000 square feet Biomechanics Research Building that has opened in August of 2013. This is the first building dedicated to biomechanics research in the world. It is also the first building on his campus exclusively dedicated to research. Recently was able to procure 11.6 million to build a 30,000 square feet expansion to this building.

Darryl Thelen

Darryl Thelen

Fellow Since: 2017

Current Affiliation: University of Wisconsin, Madison

Dr. Thelen is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has affiliate faculty appointments in Materials Science and Engineering, the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation and the Institute on Aging. He earned his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University in 1987, and his MSE and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1988 and 1992, respectively.

Dr. Thelen’s work involves the development of innovative computational models, novel sensors and dynamic imaging to investigate the structure, mechanics and behavior of musculoskeletal tissues within the human body. He has leveraged advances in these technologies to investigate treatments of a number of physical disabilities, including gait disorders in children, total knee joint replacements and osteoarthritis. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and a number of private companies and foundations. Dr. Thelen has been a member of ASB since 1995, and had the pleasure of previously serving as the Program Chair (2010) and President (2014-15) of the society.

Savio L-Y. Woo

Savio L-Y. Woo

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Savio L-Y. Woo is a Distinguished University Professor of Bioengineering and the Founder and Director of the Musculoskeletal Research Center (MSRC), a diverse multidisciplinary research and educational center in the Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. He arrived at the University of Pittsburgh in 1990 after spending 20 years at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) as a Professor of Surgery and Bioengineering. Dr. Woo received his B.S. degree from Chico State College (1965), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (1966, 1971) from University of Washington. In 1999, Dr. Woo was bestowed a Doctor of Science Degree (Hon.) from the Trustees of the California State University System and in 2008, he earned a Doctor of Engineering Degree (Hon.) from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Dr. Woo is a pioneer in bioengineering and is renowned for his 40 years of translational research in healing and repair of tissues. Together with his team, they have authored 315 original research papers in refereed journals as well as 142 book chapters and review articles. Their work has significantly impacted the management of ligament and tendon injuries including clinical paradigm shifts that have led to improved patient outcome. More recently, Dr. Woo has focused on using novel functional tissue engineering to heal and to regenerate ligament and tendon at the molecular, cellular, tissue and organ levels. Also, he has pioneered the use of robotic technology to study the function of ACL and to improve ACL reconstruction procedures. When combining it with biplanar fluoroscopy, he and his team will be able to better characterize mechanisms of ACL injury and find better ways for its prevention.

Dr. Woo has educated over 465 orthopaedic surgeons, post-doctoral fellows and students from all around the globe including, Japan, Germany, Greece, Italy, Taiwan, Turkey, Korea, Canada, England, Norway, India, Thailand, Hong Kong SAR, and China. He has also mentored 37 junior faculty members.

Dr. Woo has been a leader in Bioengineering and Orthopaedics. He has served as Chair of ASME’s Bioengineering Division, United States National Committee of Biomechanics, and the World Council for Biomechanics as well as President for The Orthopaedic Research Society, American Society of Biomechanics, and International Society for Fracture Repair. He has also founded the International Symposium on Ligaments and Tendons (ISL&T) and World Association for Chinese Biomedical Engineers (WACBE).

Dr. Woo has been inducted into the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Academia Sinica, only one of four persons who have gained all three of these honors. He has also received the highest honors from many professional societies, including the Kappa Delta Award, the Herbert R. Lissner Medal, the O’Donoghue Sports Injury Research Award, the Giovanni Borelli Award, the Muybridge Medal, and the prestigious Diamond Award for Distinguish Achievement from the University of Washington, among others. Most recently, he was given the IEEE Gold Medal for Innovation in Healthcare Technology from the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers. In 1998, Dr. Woo received the Olympic Prize for Sports Science from the International Olympic Committee and the first Olympic gold medal at the Nagano Games in Japan.

Ronald F. Zernicke

Ronald F. Zernicke

Fellow Since: 2011

Current Affiliation: University of Michigan

Ron Zernicke is Professor & Dean of the University of Michigan School of Kinesiology, and Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Biomedical Engineering. His BA is from Concordia University Chicago, and and his MSc and PhD are from University of Wisconsin–Madison. At University of Calgary, he was Wood Professor in Joint Injury Research, Faculty of Medicine, and Dean of the Faculty of Kinesiology. Previously, he was Professor and Chair, UCLA Department of Kinesiology.

He received the UCLA Award for Distinguished Teaching, City of Calgary Award for Education, and was Alumnus of the Year for Concordia University Chicago. He was president of the Canadian, American, and International Societies of Biomechanics. Research awards include NASA, Society for Physical Regulation in Biology and Medicine, American and International Societies of Biomechanics, Career Award from the Canadian Society for Biomechanics, the Founder’s Award for Best Research from the Canadian Orthopaedic Research Society, and the Partnership Award from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research. He is a Fellow of the Canadian and American Societies of Biomechanics, American College of Sports Medicine, and National Academy of Kinesiology. His research focuses on the adaptation of bone to exercise, disuse, diet, and disease; and joint injury and post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

Kristin Zhao

Kristin Zhao

Fellow Since: 2020

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